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MENAFN - Jordan Times - 27/08/2012

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(MENAFN - Jordan Times) The Syrian crisis crossed the border into Lebanon. Tripoli, in the north of Lebanon, is a battlefield between the supporters of the Syrian revolution and those of the Syrian regime.

More than 30,000 Syrian Alawites were moved to Jabal Mohsen, in Tripoli, and given Lebanese citizenship during the Lebanese civil war, when the Syrian military had control of Lebanon.

Syria pressures Lebanon to prevent smuggling weapons to Sunni areas near its border, and to threaten other neighbours not to get involved and lend support to the revolutionary groups in Syria.

The dominating party in Lebanon, Hizbollah, supports Syria with personnel and political backing.

Without the Syrian regime, Hizbollah and the Iranian influnce in Lebanon will lose ground.

Recently, Hizbollah kidnapped a number of Syrian activists who support the revolution, in reaction to the kidnapping in Syria of 48 Iranians by the Free Syrian Army.

Iran also supports Syria with military advisers and special groups, as well as financial aid.

Syrian military activities take place along the Lebanese border. Many Syrian refugees were targeted and many Lebanese citizens were wounded.

The political scene in Lebanon is divided between those who support the Syrian revolution and those who are allies of the Syrian regime.

Some prominent Christian politicians asked the government to complain to the United Nations about Syrian military activities along the border with Lebanon, condemning the kidnapping of Syrians by unknown military groups related to Hizbollah.

The Lebanese government and parliament are dominated by Syria's allies. The Lebanese government has failed so far to deal with the internal political division.

The Lebanese face difficulties because of the dominace of Hizbollah, a military party supported by Iran and Syria.

Lebanon has become subject to the Iranian-Syrian agenda in the region. This might lead to a serious crisis and to internal conflict. The Syrian crisis is dividing Lebanon, leading it once again to the brink of civil war.

The Lebanese have lost their political and national will since the last war with Israel. Hizbollah took the decision to go to war without the approval of the Lebanese government at the time; Hizbollah and Syria dragged Lebanon into an unnecessary war that destroyed a large part of Lebanon.

Now, once again Lebanon is pushed into a civil war by Syria, which, together with Hizbollah, is using Lebanon as a political card in its political game. The two use Lebanon as a backyard to ease the pressure on Syria.

Lebanon is and will remain under the control of Syria and its allies until the Assad regime falls.

The writer is former minister of information and media expert. He contributed this article to The Jordan Times.

 






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