Wednesday, 20 September 2017 07:13 GMT

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Diabetics straining Gulf health care systems

(MENAFN -Arab News) Diabetic patients impose a heavy burden on the health care systems in Gulf countries, a study says.

Saudi Arabia spends on average $4,400 per diabetic patient and around three times more on diabetic patients suffering from complications, the study said

The study, conducted by the Boston Consulting Group, measured the impact of diabetes worldwide and identified four strategies that governments and the private sector could adopt to manage the financial constraints of diabetes

The first strategy involves government intervention to support the private sector in diagnosing and treating basic forms of diabetes to provide early diagnosis and treatment to patients. This measure would cap increased costs incurred on diabetic patients in advanced stages of the disease and enhance access to patient-to-patient data for research purposes

The study also proposed the provision of treatment through an integrated health care model, with each medical center responsible for its patient’s course of treatment, including the prescription of the required treatment, referrals to specialists, follow-ups on how to provide treatment (including home care), and monitoring the patient’s compliance with the treatment, reported the study. This strategy is a critical factor for governments, particularly in the Gulf countries, as governments bear about 50 percent of the health care requirements

The third strategy involves the intensification of awareness programs for the public in order to enhance a culture that promotes early diagnosis and prevention of diabetes. According to the study, governments in the region must expand the scope of these initiatives to target people at risk of developing diabetes at an early stage

Finally, the study suggested reshaping payment models to focus on improving treatment results and identifying payment incentives that are based on the behavior patterns of the various parties involved.
Diabetics straining Gulf health care systems

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