Wednesday, 18 October 2017 08:29 GMT
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Saudi - Indian expatriates disappointed by assembly election results

(MENAFN - Arab News) The Indian expatriate community in the Kingdom described the assembly elections results in Indian states, seen as a quasi semi-final stage ahead of the 2014 national elections, as a "disappointment for secularism and democracy." The poll outcomes were announced on Sunday, in which the Hindu nationalist Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) retained the central Indian states of Madhya Pradesh and Chhattisgarh and ousted the ruling Congress Party in the state of Rajasthan. The newly-formed Aam Aadmi Party's spectacular show in Delhi, with 28 seats, pushed the Congress to third place as the BJP, which was in opposition in the national capital assembly, emerged as the single largest party. Terming it as a complete failure of the Congress Party, which is in power in many states in the country, Indian expatriates said the national party now needs deep introspection to face the tough task ahead of the Lok Sabha elections. Mohammed Quaiser, president of Tanzeem Hum Hindustani, a voluntary organization of overseas Indians in the Kingdom, told Arab News that this is a reflection of the anguish and distrust of certain sections of Indian society. He added that these states had scope for national parties only and gave no room for regional parties, which will play a crucial role in the general elections for the formation of the federal government. Naseem Ahmad, vice president of the Aligarh Muslim University Alumni Association in Riyadh, said, "There is no doubt that it is a big disappointment for secularism and democracy." He said the underestimation of the AAP by Congress was a major cause of its embarrassment in Delhi, whereas in other states, the polarization of votes on communal lines resulted in the BJP's victory, which has not done good work either in Madhya Pradesh or Chhattisgarh. Manzar Khan, who works with the Al-Rajhi Bank, said the "saffron" party has done well due to the polarization of votes on religious grounds which is not good for upcoming national elections. He also said that an outbreak of more communal riots before the election would only weaken the fight against communalism. Sheila Dikshit, chief minister of Delhi for 15 years, resigned after leading the party to a rout. Dikshit herself lost by a huge margin to AAP founder leader, Arvind Kejriwal, in the New Delhi constituency, which she considered her pocketborough. Mohammed Uzair Ansari, a travel consultant in Jeddah, said: "In Delhi, Dikshit paid the price for the party's central government's poor performance." Bheem Singh, a technician from the Sakar district in Rajasthan, said: "Congress has failed to understand public mood and is busy in its traditional factional fighting, whereas the BJP has consolidated position as a strong party that helped to shift the power dynamic." Pappu Khan, who is also a technician from Jaipur in Rajasthan, said: "We wish that Congress retains power, but we also know that it won't succeed in doing so."
Saudi - Indian expatriates disappointed by assembly election results